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Impact – Autumn 2013
Oct 3rd, 2013 by Honorary Editor

Contents

Editorial: Back to Basics…

A comparison of 23 Things

Future libraries, infinite possibilities: a report from WLIC2013

University of Portsmouth Library: Summer Staff Development Event

My Chartership Journey

 

Editorial: Back to basics…
Oct 3rd, 2013 by Honorary Editor

Welcome to the Autumn 2013 issue of Impact, Journal of the Career Development Group.

This edition of Impact features articles on chartership, training and career development, just as you would expect! Thanks to all contributors for their hard work and for sharing their experiences.

My University of Glasgow colleague Leigh Bunton shares her experience of two 23 Things training programmes and how they have been a very useful way of enhancing her skills and chartership portfolio:

A comparison of 23 Things

Attending conferences is another way of  enhancing your CPD and there is no bigger library conference in Europe than IFLA’s World Library and Information Congress. Charlotte Smith was lucky enough to attend this year’s event and shares her experience with us:

Future libraries, infinite possibilities: a report from WLIC2013

As well as external opportunities, there may be opportunities to collaborate with colleagues, both in organising events and attending them. Written by one of the organisers (Jeanette Hawkins) and an attendee (Linda Holt) of a staff event at the University of Portsmouth , this article highlights the benefits for both:

University of Portsmouth Library: Summer Staff Development Event

Hearing about other’s chartership stories can be useful and Alison Hoolihan charts her progress on the journey she took to chartership:

My Chartership Journey

Unfortunately, the fundraising report on the projects that CDG supports was not ready as we went to press on this issue. Your continuing support for these projects is hugely appreciated and I look forward to sharing an update with you soon.

As always, please do get in touch if you have any ideas/thoughts for articles. Comment on articles, send me an email, tweet me or send a letter – all communications welcome.

Sharon Lawler
Honorary Editor
email: impact@careerdevelopmentgroup.org.uk
Twitter (CDG): @CILIPCDG
Twitter: @slawler

A comparison of 23 Things
Oct 3rd, 2013 by Honorary Editor

By Leigh Bunton

23 Things

Introduction

As a library assistant working within a large academic library, it has often been difficult to gain access to onsite training and professional development, particularly as someone working independently towards chartership. A better understanding of rapid developments in information technology, social media and mobile devices as they apply to the library environment quickly became one of the key development areas I wanted to pursue when I started my chartership process in 2011, so I began searching for ways to gain relevant experience externally.

Discovery of the 23 Things Concept

Possible options, such as the Open University, could not offer the content I was looking for, precisely because of the constantly evolving nature of social media and emerging technologies. The solution was instead provided by my friend Claire Bell, Multimedia Librarian at Aberdeen Public Library, who had helped to develop the 23 Things: Libraries and Web 2.0 online course and encouraged me to participate. Based on Helene Blower’s original 23 Things course designed to encourage staff at the PLCMC to pursue lifelong learning, the 23 Things model has now been emulated worldwide, filling a crucial gap in training resources by exploiting the very technology being taught. So in May 2012, I embarked upon the 23 Things: Libraries and Web 2.0 course, which at last gave me the opportunity to gain knowledge and experience in a range of tools that are becoming common features within the library profession.

23 Things: Libraries and Web 2.0

Background

23 Things: Libraries and Web 2.0 was developed by staff at Aberdeen, Suffolk, Surrey and Portsmouth library authorities, sharing the aims of the original – to support and motivate library staff to learn about web 2.0 and new technologies. Additional library authorities throughout the UK are now involved in revising and updating content in order to mitigate the constant developments in social media, mobile devices, e-resources and the law. Endorsed by the Society of Chief Librarians, the course can be offered to staff or followed independently as the content is freely available online once registered.

Format

Following registration, I was provided with an overview of the course and details of the website featuring the content I would be following at my own pace. Although self-directed, each module was accompanied by a suggested duration that varied depending on the topic, with a recommendation to complete modules on a weekly basis if possible to take advantage of the wider community of concurrent participants. Seven core modules, covering essential topics such as blogging, twitter, social networking and the legal aspects of online communication, were required to achieve the completion certificate. A further twelve topics, some a combination of things, such as wikis, YouTube, cloud computing and ebooks, were provided as optional modules.

All module content was instantly available on the course website, each featuring a comprehensive introduction to the topic, a variety of related links to investigate, and several defined activities to be completed at the end of each topic and reflected upon. Optional follow-up activities were included, providing more depth to the topic if preferred. As with other 23 Things courses, participants were required to create an individual blog within the first week – an outcome in itself. For the remainder of the course, learning outcomes would then be posted on the blog and assessed by the course mentor via comments made in response to each entry. Participants were also encouraged to read and comment on each other’s blog entries to promote discussion, expand personal and professional networks, and add value to the overall learning experience. The option for mentor-only access to blogs was also offered.

Outcomes

The 23 Things online format was the ideal solution to the learning deficit I was experiencing, enabling me to fit the course schedule around my daily responsibilities similar to distance learning, but without fees or strict deadlines. As librarians had developed the course content, it was perfectly tailored to my training needs, providing me with the opportunity to learn not just about social networking and emerging technologies, but how they are being applied to the library environment. The guidance of a mentor throughout the course was very effective, prompting me to think about a given topic in different ways and reinforcing a sense of community with other participants. The defined activities at the end of each topic helped me to remain focused and became the means by which I was able to measure my own progress.

It is inevitable that the content of any 23 Things  course can become outdated fairly quickly, and I found that a couple of online tools had already become obsolete e.g. iGoogle, Rollyo. I also found that it took me a long time to complete the course as I underestimated the time it would take to investigate a new topic from scratch and post a well-considered review of the outcomes. This is perhaps where the workplace setting originally envisioned by the coordinators would have proved particularly beneficial as I certainly struggled to dedicate the time required in addition to work and other chartership commitments. Although the course coordinators recognised this possibility, providing the option to focus simply on the seven core modules, I felt that the additional topics were equally as important to my development; therefore I persevered and was able to complete all 23 things by June 2013.

23 Things Mobile @ Glasgow University Library

Background

In 2011, Glasgow University Library’s Mobile Strategy Group identified a range of emerging technologies that the library should be using to offer services to students, and thus the training required for library staff to deliver those services. Following this research, examples of mobile devices popular amongst students (e-readers, smart phones and tablets) were purchased for investigative use and staff were given an initial chance to familiarise themselves with the devices during a drop-in session in July 2011. In keeping with the staff development aims of the library’s mobile strategy, and following the implementation of the mobile quick search facility, the Library Mobile website, and the introduction of QR codes, staff training in the form of  23 Things Mobile was launched in March 2013.

Format

In May 2013, I was part of the second round of staff at Glasgow University Library to participate in the 8 week 23 Things Mobile course, designed to familiarise staff at all levels with the various aspects of mobile devices and services that students increasingly expect will be intrinsic to the library experience. Following an introductory session hosted by the course co-ordinators, participants were invited to join Moodle for access to course content, and to create their own WordPress blog account, which would then allow publishing access to the communal 23 Things blog. Course content was revealed on a weekly basis, modules consisting of three or four ‘things’ gathered together under a themed heading, e.g. devices, networks, communicating, e-resources etc. Each module provided an overview of the topic, appropriate links to follow, and a geek corner, spotlighting a particular aspect of mobile devices and services e.g. the anatomy of the smartphone, differences between apps, using ebooks etc. Staff time was permitted to complete each module and prize incentives offered to post thoughts and outcomes on the communal blog, anonymously if preferred, but this remained optional.

Although mandatory, the style of the course was fun and informal and the 23 Things team was always on hand via the blog, email or in person to answer any questions. Throughout the course, the latest mobile devices purchased for investigative purposes were made available for staff to borrow and test out at home. In week 5, all participants took part in a live lab during which all mobile devices (smartphones, e-readers, tablets and phablets) were made available, together with related activities designed to familiarise staff with key features such as QR codes, apps, mobile websites, photo-sharing, searching etc. It was also a good opportunity to learn from fellow colleagues and to discuss the wider issues of library mobile services with the course co-ordinators. Following completion of the course, an online survey and informal test was distributed to participants to gather feedback and gauge learning outcomes. Course content and access to mobile devices will continue to be available to staff beyond completion and revised in response to new technology in keeping with the ongoing library mobile strategy.

Outcomes

The most significant advantage to 23 Things Mobile was the in-house provision of the course to staff. This afforded adequate time during the working week to complete activities and keep to schedule, invaluable access to a range of the latest mobile technology not usually available either collectively or to borrow, content that was bespoke to staff training needs as identified by the Mobile Strategy Group, and the on-site support of the course coordinators. Course content was well illustrated, engaging and encouraged staff to contribute their ideas to the overall mobile strategy. Indeed, the inclusive and informal nature of the course was very effective in mitigating any fears that can often accompany exposure to new technology and the course was particularly successful in creating stronger connections between usually disparate staff and departments via the blog posts and live lab activities. The opportunity to speak to course coordinators also gave a better understanding of the library’s mobile strategy and what is likely to develop in the future, both in terms of new services and consequent skills that will be required of staff. In this regard, continued access to regularly revised course content and mobile devices will be pivotal to ensuring that the skills introduced by 23 Things mobile are maintained and supported in the long-term.

As with other 23 Things courses, blogging was the principal means by which outcomes were expressed by participants. The provision of a communal blog rather than an individual option, however, and the tendency for staff to use the blog for social topics rather than course discussion, dissuaded me from posting more than a couple of the learning outcomes I nevertheless developed offline. The application of blogging rules requiring participants to post insights into what has been learned would instead have provided an assessment mechanism and better exploited the shared learning experience of the course, though perhaps at the expense of the informality so crucial to its success. Although activities were suggested for some topics, they functioned more as follow-up exercises with no specific learning outcomes defined beyond gaining familiarity with that week’s topic, which I found limited my ability to measure my own progress irrespective of the end of course test. The absence of a mentor to critique my conclusions proved similarly restrictive, but mentoring is perhaps an unfair expectation of a work-based course catering to all staff and was largely mitigated by the ongoing support provided by the 23 Things team.

Conclusion

The changing nature of technology is precisely what prevents access to formal training and this where the concept of  23 Things courses can be most effective, whether as a distance learning option for individuals, or as a work-based solution for all staff to engage in. As a library assistant, I feel especially lucky that the original concept was library orientated, enabling me to gain social networking and technology skills specific to my profession. Whereas I benefitted substantially from the personalised mentor support and defined outcomes of 23 Things: Library and Web 2.0, my first foray into this type of learning, the in-house provision of 23 Things Mobile gave me a unique opportunity to become familiar with the latest mobile devices predominantly in use by students, and thus the confidence to provide mobile services in an academic library environment.

Both courses have enabled me to develop a solid foundation in the skills I was missing, but I am well aware that this has to be an ongoing process and I hope to build on the knowledge gained thus far by revisiting the content of each course as they are revised in response to developments in mobile technologies and online tools. Given the success of 23 Things Mobile at Glasgow University Library, I am also keen to see how this concept might be exploited further to offer a range of in-house training in different subject areas to all staff, underpinning the flexibility often required of library staff with access to learning opportunities made possible by the inclusive delivery format common to all 23 Things courses. As Helene Blowers has stated:

‘…we need to realize that continuous discovery and learning needs to be an integral part of every staff member’s day-to-day activities and not something we can just put off because it’s not convenient. Being knowledgeable of trends, tools and new information channels IS a part of our business no matter what form they come in, and as general rule I think librarians need to be more proactive in forging their own learning habits and continually challenging themselves to keep up with the curve.’

Blowers 2006

Resources

23 Things: Library and Web 2.0. 2011. 23 Things: Home. [online] Available at: http://23things.wetpaint.com/ [Accessed: 28 July 2013]

Learning 2.0. 2006. Learning 2.0 – About. [online] Available at: http://plcmcl2-about.blogspot.co.uk/ [Accessed: 2 Aug 2013].

References

Blowers, Helen. Nine Seven Best Practices on Learning 2.0 & Two Additions. Helene Blowers – Jumpstart Your Thinking [blog] 11 August 2006. Available at: http://www.heleneblowers.info/2006/11/nine-seven-best-practices-on-learning.html [Accessed 28 July 2013]

Leigh Bunton
Library Assistant
Glasgow University Library
Leigh.Bunton@glasgow.ac.uk

 

Future libraries, infinite possibilities: a report from WLIC2013
Oct 3rd, 2013 by Honorary Editor

By Charlotte Smith

Welcome banner at WLIC 2013

Welcome banner at WLIC 2013

One of the biggest benefits of being a CILIP member is that there are so many awards and bursaries to apply for which can help you to further your own professional development and develop your personal growth as an information professional. The John Campbell Trust conference / travel bursaries are one such award. Every year, these awards allow information professionals to attend their first international conference. Due to the generosity of the John Campbell Trust, this August I was able to attend IFLA’s World Library and Information Congress (WLIC) at the Suntec City convention centre in Singapore.

WLIC 2013 Conference session space

WLIC 2013 Conference session space

What first struck me when I walked into my first conference session was the scale of this conference. The room held over three thousand delegates and there were headsets available for those whose first language was not English. Then down one side of the room I spotted lots of booths with languages written on them; these were where the interpreters were based. Realising that these were for live simultaneous translation of the talks was the first step in my realisation that this conference was unlike any I had ever previously attended. I was right at the heart of the information world, hearing global updates to recurrent issues and learning first-hand about new IFLA developments and principles. I felt connected to our profession at a really deep level. All around me were people from all continents and sectors of our profession but the one thing that we all had in common was the passion for what we do: uniting people and information.

Throughout the days and the sessions, the passion and commitment was what really jumped out at me. To give an example, at one point colleagues from different continents were giving delegates a run-down of developments and challenges within the field of e-book provision. I had never really even thought about e-book promotion and e-reader availability in Africa and Asia. Now I had committed professionals telling me directly about the latest developments in e-reader access and the challenges still inherent in developing commercial acquisitions models for e-resources in Africa. Seeing how much our international colleagues accomplish with comparatively little finances and often a lack of infrastructure is a really humbling and inspiring experience. We should view each challenge as an opportunity. Instead of complaining about our lack of visibility, I was inspired to go out there and campaign for our rightful place in institutions and societies.

WLIC 2013 Conference Centre

WLIC 2013 Conference Centre

There was a wealth of topics connected to the main theme of ‘the future’ which took place across four days of sessions, from subject access to Open Access and resource discovery tools to the semantic web. Collection management, resource sharing models, classification of film and e-resource access developments all made an appearance. The standout topics for me were resource collaboration, the impact of Open Access on the research landscape, and the future of MARC as we move towards collection exposure in web search engines using linked data. The amount of projects and new research presented was incredible, from Taiwan’s public library e-book service to a case study of knowledge sharing in Indonesian libraries.

Charlotte at the conference

Charlotte at the conference

As a WLIC first-timer, I was quite often baffled and overwhelmed, but being overwhelmed can be a great thing. I dipped my toe into the waters of international librarianship and I ended up riding the rapids of new research and plunging headlong into new areas, concepts and contacts. I met some amazing people, spoke to lots of suppliers, went into sessions on a whole range of global topics and generally expanded my professional compass to start seeing the issues that affect us all on a much more global level. Bibliographic data standards, information literacy, new publishing models, DRM, e-resource provision: these are topics that affect us all, slightly differently in different parts of the world perhaps, but we still all face them despite our surface differences. The motivation and inspiration that I felt at being a part of such a global meeting of professionals is indescribable. To be at the cutting edge of new IFLA announcements and to meet so many inspiring professionals was an honour and a pleasure. I would not have been able to attend this conference without the support of the award. Attending WLIC2013 has developed me so much as both an information professional and a human being. I could think of no better way to develop myself and my career.

 

Charlotte Smith
Assistant Librarian
Modern & Medieval Languages
Library, University of Cambridge
Email: cs531@cam.ac.uk

 

All images: Charlotte Smith

 

University of Portsmouth Library: Summer Staff Development Event
Oct 3rd, 2013 by Honorary Editor

by Jeanette Hawkins and Linda Holt

The organiser’s perspective

Jeanette Hawkins

When I received an email calling for volunteers to help organise our Summer Staff Development Event, I thought it would be a good opportunity for me to gather evidence for my Certification through CILIP.

A small group of six members of library staff met initially to come up with three possible ideas based on the theme of “Celebration of our Achievements” which were then reported back to the Library Management Team (LMT) for discussion and approval.

The LMT decided that they would like us to plan an event that would be a mixture of all three ideas, with the emphasis on celebrating our coping with massive changes to our working practices whilst still delivering a high standard of customer service.

We then met to devise a structure for the event and were each allotted a subject and were asked to design and produce a poster (and a stall if desired) to inform our colleagues of the changes brought about in the last two years and the impact they have made on our clients experience of using the library.
I volunteered to celebrate Twenty Four Hour opening which this year ran for twenty weeks from 14th January to 31st May including the formal exam period throughout May.

We were also asked to devise four questions each relating to our subject matter for a staff quiz which was based on the following themes: Inter-Library Loans, The Green Group, RFID, 24 Hour Opening, Electronic Resources, Ideas Group, Virtual Enquiries and Social Groups and we were asked to include the answers to our questions in our posters or on our stall. I based my questions on 24 Hour Opening statistics and then forwarded the questions and answers to my colleague who was compiling the quiz.

I have never designed a poster before but with a little help from a colleague with more experience I designed a poster based on Arkwright’s shop from Open All Hours advertising items that our users brought into the Library during our extended opening hours. I also organised a stall laid out as though it were a corner shop with relevant items such as energy drink cans, sleeping bags, waste paper bins, USB memory sticks etc. I attached the answers to my questions to the front of an A4 notebook displayed on the stall. I also made a laminated Open shop sign to attach to the stall.

Lunch and a Quiz

On the day the event began with a hot meal and refreshments followed by a period of browsing of the posters and stalls to gain information to answer the quiz questions to follow.

Randomly dividing people into teams made everyone mingle with colleagues from different sections of the Library. The quiz certainly seemed to bring out the competitive streak in some of our colleagues and as we had a good mixture of people with various experience we seemed to do well in our team.

Space Planning

The next part of the event involved a Space Planning team building exercise which consisted of each table being given a blown up section of the Library floor plan to look at and come up with three important improvements we thought could be made, taking into account budget restraints and we were given plasticine, coloured pens and coloured card to make models of our new improved layout. The plasticine proved very popular with nearly every table using it to make items of furniture etc to place in their models. Each team had to appoint a spokesperson to report on our models and explain our ideas and they each seemed to delight in showing off their plasticine creations.
This was followed by the results of the quiz with the losing team being presented with the loser’s wooden spoon which had been decorated with a letter L. This caused much amusement.

Wrap Up

The afternoon ended with a speech from the Head of Library thanking us all for all our hard work though a difficult period of transition and for managing to cope with many changes to our working practices whilst still delivering a high standard of customer service to our clients.
I am glad that I volunteered for this planning group as I felt proud of our achievement especially as we had very limited time to plan this event during our busiest period in the academic year. All in all we had some very positive feedback and a college who attended the event has written about it from the perspective of the participant.

The Participant’s Perspective

Linda Holt

As a participant at this event I found it very enjoyable with a good balance of light- heartedness as well as some serious work. From my point of view it was a good way to celebrate our achievements as a Library over the past year.

The afternoon began with us all gathering in the University’s 3rd Space building (usually student social space) where the walls had been decorated with some wonderful displays detailing our major achievements, which we were told we should study carefully before lunch! The organising committee had done a brilliant job and had made them fun as well as informative and diverse. They celebrated everything from the introduction of self service and 24 hour opening to our charity work and social events.

We all sat down to lunch with our heads packed with information ready for later. It was great to have the opportunity to all gather for lunch as we are not often all able to get together in this way. It gave us the chance to chat to colleagues we would not normally see on a day to day basis.

Lunch over and with everybody suitably replete, we were called to order and had to pick a lucky dip number to determine our table for a quiz about the displays we had studied earlier. The lucky dip idea was great as it meant each table had a mixture of Library Staff and there was usually someone who knew the answer. Unfortunately our table didn’t win but we didn’t get the wooden spoon either!

We then moved onto the more serious work with a “Space Planning team building exercise”. We had a part of the User Services area to look at. It was interesting to see what ideas staff who worked in other parts of the Library brought to this task. As Jeanette has already mentioned there were some very creative plasticine models to go with the very colourful plans that emerged! Each group reported back on their plans and some very different ideas came out of this exercise.

The afternoon drew to a close with a speech from the University Librarian, with her thanks for our hard work in a time of continuous change. This was followed by celebratory cake.

I felt that it had been a very successful, enjoyable and motivational afternoon for all who took part and that the hard work of the organisers had paid off. The event had achieved a balance between serious elements and informality and fun. It also gave staff such as Jeanette and myself the opportunity for further staff development on the form of feedback for our own colleagues and those in the wider community. We hope that our article will encourage others to organise similar events for staff.

Jeanette Hawkins
Library Assistant
User Services
University Library
jeanette.hawkins@port.ac.uk

Linda Holt
Library Assistant
User Services
University Library
linda.holt@port.ac.uk

 

 

My Chartership Journey
Oct 3rd, 2013 by Honorary Editor

By Alison Hoolihan

Introduction

A little over a year ago I returned to work after having just had nine months off on maternity leave. I was quite eager to return and I felt very motivated to get stuck back into my role as librarian at Halton Libraries, where I had worked for 7 years. Before my maternity leave, I had been working as part-time librarian and part-time stock manager. I had found the two job roles to be challenging but very rewarding and worthwhile, so I was more than a little apprehensive to return to work knowing that my 3 year secondment as stock manager had ended in the early months of my maternity leave. I would be returning to work as a full time librarian. Would the single job role be as demanding and as fast paced for me as having two roles? Would it be as rewarding? These were just a few of the questions whizzing around my head on returning to work.

However, I need not have worried. I returned to work during the summer holidays and found myself slap bang in the middle of all the excitement and chaos that surrounds the Summer Reading Challenge. I was also assigned to work alongside our Reader Development Officer on the Reading Families project, which was part of a national digital skills workgroup set up by the Reading Agency. So my first few months back as full-time librarian were very busy and fulfilling and the summer weeks flew by.

It was as autumn turned into winter that my mind began to wander. As content as I was, I began to ask myself would there ever be another development opportunity such as the seconded stock manager role? What other projects could I undertake in order to progress my career? I soon realised that I certainly wasn’t happy to just sit in my job watching the years roll by. I questioned whether I should change sectors even though I loved working in public libraries. My motivation gradually began to wane.

I felt my most demotivated towards the end of the year when a staff management position became available within Halton Libraries. I knew that that particular area of management didn’t really appeal to me so I decided not to apply. However, some of my colleagues assumed I didn’t want the job because I had other things on my mind, “what with having twins and all.” This point of view frustrated me endlessly (and I’m sure other working mums as well). Yes, I’ve had children, but I’m a professional, who at the age of 33, would still like to progress in my career. I wanted to shout from the rooftops, “I can still have a career even though I’m a mother!”

I had reached a crucial point. I had to think of something I could do in order to motivate myself once again and to reconnect with the rewarding job that I had. I had to find something that could help me to progress my career. The answer gradually became clear – chartership.

Being honest, I have to admit that I had previously rejected the idea of chartership, believing it to be an over- complicated and convoluted way of recording what I do in my job. Indeed, a number of my colleagues had recently undertaken chartership and had become members of local CILIP groups in the process, which only made me scoff at the process even more – why would I want to copy what others had done before me? I wanted to do something different; I didn’t want to follow the crowd.

However, 2013 had gotten underway and I still wasn’t feeling overly motivated. The more I considered my career path the clearer the direction I should take became. Chartership would allow me to fully participate in my profession to a level I felt comfortable pushing myself towards. Looking at the chartership pages on CILIP’s website and reading example portfolios from other candidates, I realised that the chartership process was a very personal one and I could take it in whatever direction I wanted, focusing on areas that I wanted to develop within my role. I could tailor it to suit my own needs.

First steps

Taking a deep breath, and filled with much trepidation, I took my first step. I decided that I would look at the Professional Knowledge and Skills Base (PKSB) on CILIP’s website to assess my development needs in order to decide which areas I wanted to concentrate on during my chartership. The PKSB helped me to identify areas that I didn’t have that much experience or knowledge in and that I wanted to develop within my role as public librarian. From this assessment, I then found that the barebones of my chartership were coming together. I was then able to draw up my PPDP and find a mentor – I was officially on the road to chartership! That wasn’t too scary, was it?

The weeks and months that followed were filled with numerous development opportunities, activities and events in order to collate evidence for my chartership portfolio. I have initiated some of the events myself but I am lucky enough to have a very supportive management team who have also delegated projects and tasks to me. I have worked in partnership with local wellbeing organisations, I have led safer Internet tutorials within the council, I have had the opportunity to manage a small satellite library within a local community centre and I have attended useful training days on subjects as varied as digital signage, change management, and digital skills in libraries. An important part of chartership is critical reflection, so after I participate in an activity, I studiously write up my reflections in my blog. I also take the time to develop my wider professional knowledge by reading journals and following key organisations and individuals within the library and information sector on Twitter. Who would have thought, twelve months ago, that I would have a blog and a Twitter account? The year, so far, has truly flown by for me.

I would not say that everything has been plain sailing. Managing the satellite library has certainly been a steep learning curve for me, but invaluable experience nevertheless. I have definitely had to learn to prioritise my workload due to the extra activities that I volunteered for and I have had to be quite disciplined in reading around the wider profession (there are certainly some evenings when I just want to switch off and not look at Twitter).

Key benefits

What has undertaking the chartership process meant for me? Chartership has allowed me to take ownership of my career and to take it in the direction that I want it to go in. I believe that chartership has expanded my role and, as a result, I have undertaken activities and events that I previously would not have taken part in. I have undertaken job shadowing roles within other library sectors, I have attended a PR seminar at Manchester Metropolitan University, and I have attended the CILIP North West AGM and heard a number of presentations from inspiring people within the library sector. I have had the opportunity to meet many interesting people within the profession, from all library sectors. I have spoken to a librarian from Africa and compared libraries at home to those on other countries. I have met prison librarians, health librarians, those working in armed forces libraries, academic and school librarians – all fascinating people with a lot of knowledge to share.

I have definitely pushed myself out of my comfort zone and, as a result, gained confidence in my skills and knowledge. I’ve been the weekly ‘voice’ on the national Voices for the Library Twitter feed (@VoicesLibrary), I’ve assisted in a presentation given to Reader Development Librarians from all over the north west at the newly refurbished Liverpool Library, I have even written this article.

I’ve learnt and developed new skills including social media skills, PR and marketing, leadership skills and partnership working. As a result, I’m more confident in doing my job and more self-assured when on training/networking events, knowing that I have knowledge of my profession and all that surrounds it as a result of what I have undertaken and my wider professional reading.

The new skills I have developed can and have all been applied to my position as librarian. Subsequently, I feel I am a more assertive, self-possessed professional who is able to assist the public to the highest standard. To put it simply, I believe that I am now better at my job as a result of participating in the chartership process.

Most importantly, on a personal level, working towards my chartership has reconnected me to my career. I have fallen back in love with being a librarian. I am more motivated and more committed than ever to libraries and librarianship. I am now open to trying new things and developing new skills. When training opportunities come up I now ask what new skills will I learn from this? Not only am I proud to say that I am a librarian, I am proud to say that I am undertaking chartership.

What does the rest of the year hold for me? Well, I’m now beginning to think about structuring all of my evidence and reflections into a coherent portfolio format. There’s still a lot of work for me to do but I’ve set myself the deadline of Christmas for submission which looks achievable (fingers crossed!) And if I’m lucky enough to be awarded chartership? I’m looking into doing a MOOC on New Librarianship that some of my colleagues have already undertaken and then I would be quite interested in training as a mentor in order to offer insights into what I have learnt throughout this process, to support and advise and mostly to keep people motivated.

Chartership can be seen as a long and lonely process that takes people away from their daily roles. It isn’t. I believe that it has been a challenging yet rewarding journey that opens up countless opportunities for development and progression. In these challenging times, I believe that chartership gives credence to our profession and allows for parity with other professions. Whether you are a new professional, or a mid-career professional, like me, I would definitely recommend chartership.

Alison Hoolihan
Librarian
Halton Libraries
alison.hoolihan@halton.gov.uk

Impact – Summer 2013
Jul 8th, 2013 by Honorary Editor

Contents

Editorial – Getting Organised…

Putting the Fun into Fundraising

Veni, Vidi, Vici – Walking Hadrian’s Wall 

The highs and lows of planning a fundraising party

Reflections on ACLIP

Continuing professional development (CPD) on a budget

Librarians as Teachers 2013: An organiser’s point of view

Running a session at Library Camp North East

 

**Downloadable print versions of the articles will be available shortly**

 

 

 

 

Editorial – Getting Organised…
Jul 8th, 2013 by Honorary Editor

Welcome to the Summer 2013 issue of Impact, Journal of the Career Development Group.

This edition of Impact features a range of articles, including articles on fundraising, CPD on a budget, organising and taking part in events and the benefits of ACLIP.

CDG NE division are renowned for being power fundraisers for CDG international projects and Becky Skoyles has shared their tips and tricks on fundraising ideas in this issue. As well as this, we have two case studies on fundraising events (one from Becky and one from Tracey Ainsley) to inspire us all.

Putting the Fun into Fundraising

Veni, Vidi, Vici – Walking Hadrian’s Wall 

The highs and lows of planning a fundraising party

Qualifications within CILIP are changing, but the ACLIP route is still an option towards a more professional future, as Abi Heath shares her ACLIP journey.

Reflections on ACLIP

As budgets shrink, it can be difficult to get the funding and time for CPD.  Elen Wyn Davies offers some tips to make the most of CPD.

Continuing professional development (CPD) on a budget

Organising events is one way of gaining skills outwith your day job, and this article from Lisa Basini, one of the team from Librarians as Teachers 2013, offers insight into the benefits, as well as the challenges.

Librarians as Teachers 2013: An organiser’s point of view

Unconferences are springing up everywhere (Our own Franko Kowalczuk was part of the Un-brella unconference team at Umbrella this year) and this account from Rosie Hare offers some thoughts on running a session at Library Camp North East

Running a session at Library Camp North East

The next issue will be out in September and it is already shaping up to be a great issue. There will be a report from our international projects officer, on how your fundraising is being spent, as well as some interesting articles on 23 things training, project management and more.

As always, please do get in touch if you have any ideas/thoughts for articles. Comment on articles, send me an email, tweet me or send a letter – all communications welcome.

Sharon Lawler
Honorary Editor
email: impact@careerdevelopmentgroup.org.uk
Twitter: @slawler

 

Putting the Fun into Fundraising
Jul 8th, 2013 by Honorary Editor

By Becky Skoyles

Introduction

Board1

Fundraising achievements board, from our 2012 AGM

At CDG North Eastern we have an enthusiastic approach to fundraising and this article will give an overview of activities that we have undertaken, how they were achieved and how successful they were. There are a range of events, from the minimum effort to the more adventurous, depending on how much time and effort you have to give to planning and hosting the event.

Sponsored walks

We plan an annual sponsored walk:, typically these walks are around 8 miles with the exception being the 2012 sponsored walk which was 84 miles from coast to coast following Hadrian’s Wall. (For more on the Hadrian’s Wall walk, see Tracey Ainsley’s case study article – Ed.) The typical sponsored walk takes a few hours, depending on how long you stop for a break, it’s a good idea to have a bar stop roughly half way through your walk for refreshments and comfort breaks.

The 2011 sponsored walk was composed of 2 circular walks around Craster, each was 4 miles long and took in the scenic Northumberland coast, this walk raised £439. In between walks we stopped at a pub in Craster and visited the art shop. Money was raised by advertising the walk on our events web page with a link to an online donation page and by promoting in member workplaces, for example, a poster about the walk and the projects we were raising money for was put up on the staff notice board and a sponsorship form went in the staff room. When taking into account the range of workplaces that members work in, you can reach a wide network of potential sponsors.

This year,  I am planning a 9 mile circular walk taking in the bridges over the River Tees. I will advertise the event on our events web page, produce a poster to be distributed throughout the division so members can place it in their workplace and by raising awareness we will hopefully raise contributions, so that when our members take to the riverside walkways of Middlesbrough, we will raise a large amount for the current international projects. Get in touch if you would like to join us.

Fundraising party

In October 2012 we hosted a children’s themed fancy dress party  A team of members organised the party so there wasn’t the pressure of one person trying to organise the event. (For more on organising this type of event, see Becky’s case study article – Ed.)

Fundraising bucket

CDG NE has an old metal bucket, just a small one, which we have out at AGMs, visits and events. It is open topped for convenience so people can simply throw in a handful of loose change. We have a folding display board where we have information about CDG and the international projects we are raising money for, there are several pictures of the division and of previous international projects, to make it more visually appealing than being bombarded with text, the board is placed on a table so that it is a comfortable height. It is important to have information about what has happened with money raised so that people know their money is going to a good cause. At the 2013 AGM, £12 was raised, it’s not a large quantity but all the small quantities add up to make a significant contribution.

Jewellery sale

A collection was made of costume jewellery that members no longer wanted, all donations were displayed nicely on black felted boards and priced from 50p to £5, a bowl was left out on the table in front of the display for people to pay into. The display started in one member’s workplace where an email was sent out describing what we were doing and asking for more unwanted costume jewellery, needless to say we received quite a few donations so the items on display were constantly changing. After several days, the display was rotated to a different member’s workplace where the procedure was repeated, again new items were donated so the display continued to grow and change. The display was passed around a number of workplaces raising a total of £223.12.

Bar rally

Every 2 years or so, two members organise a bar rally. An initial clue is given which will lead the participants to a series of clues taking them to different bars around Newcastle, eventually ending up at the finish point (a bar). The organisers get permission from bars to place clues by agreeing that participants will have a drink in each bar (does not have to be an alcoholic drink) and a small selection of prizes are offered which have been donated by local businesses. Prizes are given for best team name and the first team to finish.

Visits

We organise a visit each year to local libraries. While these are free, you can suggest a donation to the international projects and present the bucket at either the start or end of the visit, leaving it up to people on the visit to make a donation if they choose to.

Fundraising tips

This article has demonstrated that there are a range of options for fundraising; the only restriction is how much effort you’re able and willing to put into it.

  • The more effort you put in the more you will raise
  • Research fundraising ideas online
  • Have a sneaky peek at what the other divisions are doing, or even the other SIGs and ‘borrow’ ideas from them
  • Whilst there is a significant amount of time involved in setting up things up to start with they can be updated quickly and easily, for example, the folding board for the bucket took a while to put together the first time, after that it gets updated by adding a picture taken at the last sponsored walk and a quick report on the international projects
  • More than one person can organise the event, if anything it would be better to have a team of around 5 people planning larger events, or contributing information such as advice on the best place to stop for a drink on the sponsored walk or best way to get there on public transport if you can’t get a cheap minibus
  • Create an annual event so that people become familiar with the group and the event, while the sponsored walks are planned by CDG there are non-members who help fundraise and take part
  • Make use of social media, so many people these days rely on social media to find stuff out, put your event out there and help people find it
  • Be clear about what it is you are raising money for and how that money is being spent

Becky Skoyles
Information Assistant
University of Northumbria
rebecca.skoyles@northumbria.ac.uk

Veni, Vidi, Vici – Walking Hadrian’s Wall
Jul 8th, 2013 by Honorary Editor

By Tracey Ainsley

Introduction

This time last year I was about to start on one of the hardest journey’s on my life, walking the length if Hadrian’s wall in aid of the Career Development Group (CDG) International projects and The Lit & Phil Library in Newcastle.
It had started out the previous year when my husband made a flippant remark about the walk being part of his 50th birthday celebrations. CDG North Eastern has an annual walk which is normally about 10 miles. Hadrian’s wall is over 70 miles but the path takes you on some detours around farmland and the walk in all is 84 miles. A big difference from the usual 10! We started training six months earlier and a couple of friends said they would join us for the whole journey; they were raising funds for the North East Air Ambulance service. The walk was going to be split over 5 days and accommodation, maps and routes were arranged for us by Mac Adventures.

The Walk

Day 1: Bowness on Solway to Carlisle (15 miles)

thestart

The start…

After spending the night in The Old Rectory, we started in Bowness, a pretty little coastal village. It was a glorious day with amazing scenery and mostly flat until we reached the outskirts of Carlisle which was tough going when you were nearing the end of your day. Along the river bank you were up and down stairs along the cutting.

Day 2: Carlisle to Gilsland. (18 miles)

Hi-ho

Hi ho, off we go…

We were joined by committee member Louise Gordon and Chris Myers, a colleague from Northumbria University, at Carlisle. Chris joined us for the two hardest days whilst he was training to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. The sun again was shining and we were even joined by some greedy chickens when we stopped for lunch. We actually started to see some large amounts of the remaining Hadrian’s wall but the terrain was starting to get harder. It took about 9 hours walking this day and in the last couple of miles, it started to rain.

Day 3: Gilsland to Chollerford (20 miles)

The highest low point...

The highest low point…

The most picturesque but hardest part of the route taking in: high craggs; Sycamore Gap, made famous in the Robin Hood film; rampant bulls; torrential horizontal rain and flooded country lanes – possibly the worst day of our lives. At times you just looked around and could see miles and miles of countryside with no apparent civilisation in sight. 11.5 hours of walking, climbing, slipping, crying. We just wanted to die. Our saving grace was Chris’ wife who periodically turned up in her car with refreshments and the Hadrian Hotel staff at Wall near Chollerford who stayed late for us to make us food after 11.5 hours walking.

Day 4: Chollerford to Heddon on the wall. (15 miles)

We had said good bye to Chris the previous evening, and as the weather picked up again we picked up colleagues Helene Farn from Newcastle University library and Kate Duggan from Northumbria. As usual I was like the cows tail, hanging on in at the back, but this day we felt we were getting somewhere. Heddon was not too far from home and we would be in our own beds that night. This day was a doddle compared to the previous day and the thought of a pint kept us going.

Day 5: Heddon-Wallsend (12 miles)

After a good night’s sleep in our own beds, we returned to Heddon and were joined by other CDG NE members for the last leg. I don’t know whether it was because this was familiar turf or the fact that we knew the end was in sight but we practically ran the 12 miles in 4 hours! We were now out of the countryside going through Newcastle on our way to Wallsend.

all-together-now

All together now…

At Newcastle we picked up many more colleagues for the last 5 miles of the walk. We finished the walk in Wallsend at the Roman fort of Segedunum after five days with sore feet and aching legs but all proud of what we had achieved walking the Hadrian Wall path. We would recommend it to anyone and if anyone has any questions about the event, please feel free to contact me.

The Result

Although this was a major challenge for us, it was all in a good cause. Over £1400 was raised and split between CDG international projects and the development fund of the Lit & Phil library.

Handing cheque over at the Lit and Phil Library

Handing cheque over at the Lit and Phil Library

 

More photographs from the walk are available on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/46136844@N00/sets/72157630004775953/

 

Tracey Ainsley
Library Liaison Adviser
Northumbria University Library
tracey.ainsley@northumbria.ac.uk

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